clevergirlhelps:

rebalovelace:

characterandwritinghelp:

clementive:

clevergirlhelps:

clevergirlhelps:

*dares you to write medieval fantasy without royal or noble-blooded protagonist(s)*

*dares you to write multiple viewpoint medieval fantasy entirely from women’s perspectives*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy without magic*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy with twists*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy with poc featuring a prominent role and/or without European-esque people*

Wunderbar. 

More dares:

*write medieval fantasy with LBGT featuring prominent roles.*

*write medieval fantasy set anywhere but in Europe.*

*write medieval fantasy that doesn’t portray a barbaric-evil-fat king.*

*write medieval fantasy with historically accurate scientific discoveries of the time whether they are regarded as scientifically accurate or not today.*

*write medieval fantasy without a chosen one and a prophecy.*

*write medieval fantasy without swords.*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy in which time-period accurate science and technology coexists with magic*

(*dares you to write ANYTHING in which time-period accurate science and technology coexists with magic*)

*dares you to write medieval fantasy that reimagines critters like dragons and trolls and goblins*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy that deals with such things as a lack of indoor plumbing*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy without including a knight character*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy in where there are no such things as beautiful, mythic creatures who have all the power.*

*dares you to write a medieval fantasy where there is no wise old person who has all the answers*

*dares you to write a medieval fantasy with multiple and complex religions and mythologies.*

*dares you to write a medieval fantasy where the lonely, orphaned farm-boy ISN’T the lost king.*

*dares you to write a medieval fantasy from the perspective of weapons.*

*dares you to write a medieval fantasy where magic DOESN’T make your character powerful.*

*dares you to write fantasy dealing with medieval Western Europe but not entirely/mostly not in medieval Europe*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy without a war/rebellion*

*dares you to write an early Middle Ages fantasy instead of High/Late Middle Ages fantasy*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy with a rebellion that doesn’t just produce another monarchy*

*dares you to write medieval fantasy exploring the rise of the burgher class and includes secret guild wars*

*dares you to write academic medieval fantasy*

honhonbaguetterivaille:

linestorm:

200 words that describe light

u do not understand my gratitude

archatlas:

ObviousState

6 types of love

Eros
a passionate physical and emotional love based on aesthetic enjoyment; stereotype of romantic love

Ludus
a love that is played as a game or sport; conquest; may have multiple partners at once

Storge
an affectionate love that slowly develops from friendship, based on similarity

Pragma 
love that is driven by the head, not the heart

Mania
obsessive love; experience great emotional highs and lows; very possessive and often jealous lovers

Agape
selfless altruistic love; spiritual;

Somebody to Love - bearshorty - Harry Potter - J. K. Rowling [Archive of Our Own]

this story is short but it is an adorable little wolfstar drabble and it makes me happy

victoriarene:

REBLOGGING THIS BECAUSE I GET THIS WRONG EVERY TIME

victoriarene:

REBLOGGING THIS BECAUSE I GET THIS WRONG EVERY TIME

Fic: The Only Voices Are Me and You

themostrandomfandom:

Title: The Only Voices Are Me and You

Pairing: Brittana

Rating: M

Summary: "The scientists say they have approximately ten hours left, but somehow approximately turns into exactly and everyone starts counting down the minutes."

Word Count: ~7,300

Author’s Note: Fluffy apocalypse fiction is now a thing with me, apparently. So is inline dialogue.

Read More

francofrps:



Spice up your writing.













"She looked over at him..." How many times have we used that one? Under the cut, you will find synonyms and alternatives to the word 'looked' or 'glanced'. Enjoy!












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francofrps:

Spice up your writing.

"She looked over at him..." How many times have we used that one? Under the cut, you will find synonyms and alternatives to the word 'looked' or 'glanced'. Enjoy!

Read More

lissyofrp:


HOW TO MAKE AN ORIGINAL CHARACTER: Whether you want to write a unique character for an oc rp, or you need to write a few bios for your own rp, this guide should be able to help you. 


Read More

lissyofrp:

HOW TO MAKE AN ORIGINAL CHARACTER: Whether you want to write a unique character for an oc rp, or you need to write a few bios for your own rp, this guide should be able to help you. 

Read More

cooperhelps:

SIX WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

Source

cooperhelps:

SIX WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.

2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.

3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.

4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.

5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.

6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

Source

OK to make a font out of your own writing

tomoe-chi:

nakadoo:

ilikedaisiesinthespringtime:

davestriderthetimetraveler:

kittenmogu:

chromehearts:

pelicaneggs:

go here

http://www.myscriptfont.com/

instead of printing it off just use this blank thing that way you dont have to scan it or anything

so fill that out by pasting it in any art program and whatnot

then save it and upload it to that site

and itll give you an option to download it

so do that and then install it BAM

image

image

image

I JUST GOT THIS ON MY TABLET IT’S SO COOL OH MY GOD

image

image

yainterrobang:

LIST OF THE WEEK: TEN LESBIAN PROTAGONISTS
Who doesn’t love love - in all shapes and sizes? Here’s a list celebrating ladies who love ladies! For more fun lists and all things YA lit, visit our website, follow us here and on Twitter, and subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

mae-rps:


This is a guide to how English people speak. 
*I do not claim to be an expert but I am English and these are things that I hear almost every day.


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mae-rps:

This is a guide to how English people speak. 

*I do not claim to be an expert but I am English and these are things that I hear almost every day.

Read More

❝ Anonymous asked: Your Make A Wish story is so awesome! Pleasepleasepleaseplease continue it! :'D (I mean, besides it's almost Christmas so like, yeah. heh)

You are so sweet lovely anon. I will definitely continue it, but I’m distracted by finals right now. I’m dine with everything this Thursday, so expect a chapter within a week after that.  If not you have full permission to yell at me until I do have it up.

cooperhelps:

10 Tips From Billy Wilder on How to Write a Good Screenplay:
The audience is fickle.
Grab ‘em by the throat and never let ‘em go.
 Develop a clean line of action for your leading character.
Know where you’re going.
The more subtle and elegant you are in hiding your plot points, the better you are as a writer.
If you have a problem with the third act, the real problem is in the first act.
A tip from Lubitsch: let the audience add up two plus two. They’ll love you forever.
In doing voice-overs, be careful not to describe what the audience already sees. Add to what they’re seeing.
The event that occurs at the second act curtain triggers the end of the movie.
The third act must build, build, build in tempo and action until the last event, and then — that’s it. Don’t hang around.

Source

cooperhelps:

10 Tips From Billy Wilder on How to Write a Good Screenplay:

  1. The audience is fickle.
  2. Grab ‘em by the throat and never let ‘em go.
  3.  Develop a clean line of action for your leading character.
  4. Know where you’re going.
  5. The more subtle and elegant you are in hiding your plot points, the better you are as a writer.
  6. If you have a problem with the third act, the real problem is in the first act.
  7. A tip from Lubitsch: let the audience add up two plus two. They’ll love you forever.
  8. In doing voice-overs, be careful not to describe what the audience already sees. Add to what they’re seeing.
  9. The event that occurs at the second act curtain triggers the end of the movie.
  10. The third act must build, build, build in tempo and action until the last event, and then — that’s it. Don’t hang around.

Source

©